Beltane -Pagan

Beltane (/ˈbɛl.teɪn/) is the anglicised name for the Gaelic May Day festival. Most commonly it is held on 1 May, or about halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.

Celebrated on May 1st. or beginning the evening before on the last night of April.

There are many ways to celebrate Beltane, but the focus is always on fertility. This day that has a long and sometimes scandalous history.

Maypole dancing is a lovely way to celebrate with children. Making garlands with vines and fresh flowers is also lovely. This is also one of the fire festivals, so holding a bonfire gathering is a great way to celebrate with friends and family.

The alter or nature table can be covered in a green cloth and bright spring colors. Fresh flowers or paper flowers, birds nest or eggs, you can even grow some fresh wheat grass. Tiny fairies or gnomes and butterflies may also be a lovely addition to the table, or little forest creatures. Bringing a candle or image of flames onto the table is a wonderful way to celebrate the fire of this season.

Easter Grass

One of my holiday traditions is growing Easter Grass in our baskets. It is so lovely and the kids always enjoy doing it.

1) Mark the calendar for about 1 1/2-2 weeks before Easter.

2) Line the basket with something like a few layers of cheesecloth or a scrap of rag to hold the dirt.

3) Let the kids scoop their dirt in and then sprinkle some wheat grass seeds (or raw wheat berries) over the top. We spread them pretty thick.

4) Sprinkle a little more dirt on top and water.

5) Keep them well watered and in a warm place. I’ve had a lot of luck keeping them in a large plastic tub by the window to be sure they stay moist and warm.

The grass should be nice and tall by Easter!

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